Tag Archives: Maine

Spice it Up

Raj, the unassuming king of Tulsi.

In the Winter/Spring issue of Taste of the Seacoast, my photos accompany an article by Kathy Gunst about the fantastic Indian restaurant, Tulsi, in Kittery. If you’re tired of every Indian restaurant you go to having basically the same standard offerings prepared in the same old way, get thee to this gem. The exceedingly humble and gracious chef, Raj, will knock your socks off with delectables like Shrimp Balchow (sautéed shrimp in a tangy, spicy Goan sauce served with crispy naan) and Navratan Korma (nine different vegetables in a light curry-cashew-saffron cream sauce). If you’re in the Portland area, it’s well worth the hour drive, trust me! Here are a few more images from the shoot to further entice you.

Some Tulsi kitchen staples: pomegranates and saffron.

Samuel is in charge of making all the amazing breads—from garlic naan to mint paratha—that come out of the Tulsi kitchen.

Can't you just taste that curry saffron cream sauce?

 

A New Year

Sunset, Dec. 31, 2009

The sun seemed to be wishing 2009 a fond farewell last Thursday. The snow that had been lightly falling throughout the day stopped just in time for the brilliant pinky orange orb in the sky to shine brightly as it descended below the powder-coated trees. In the hopes that the sky would be clear enough to capture the blue moon rising, I dashed from field to shore. A blanket of snow covered the rocky shoreline, but the sky was filled with milky blue clouds. Still, it was a breathtaking scene. By the following morning the blue moon’s high tide had washed much of the sugary topping away. It was a reminder to me to seize more opportunities to make images. Wait a few hours, vowing to capture it later, and the whole scene may be different. So get out there you (yes, I mean you!), and carpe that diem!

2009 | 2010

Favorite Fall Film Photos

Fall is my favorite season. I don’t think it was always that way. I wasn’t thrilled to go back to school or to rake the piles upon piles of leaves the maple trees strew across my family’s lawn when I was growing up. But as an adult, it’s ideal. The tourists are largely gone. It’s easy to find a place to be alone with nothing but the sound of rustling leaves underfoot. The light is golden yet subdued. The dark browns, deep reds and glowing yellows send me into color-driven creative frenzies. Something about spent vegetation is very appealing to me; it has more character, like a well-used pie tin. Here are some of my favorite shots from the past two months. Enjoy!

flux

temptation

onthewaytosomewhereelse

almostgone

vestiges

it'sallfun&games

losttogether

gray&alone

NYT Outtakes

The national food media has been giving little Portland, ME, a lot of attention lately, and for good reason! First, Bon Appetit’s October issue named Portland this year’s  “Foodiest Small Town in America.” And yesterday, the New York Times ran a long, photo-laden piece starting on the front page of the Dining & Wine section called “In Portland’s Restaurants, A Down East Banquet” that focuses on the collective nature of the burgeoning food scene here. As many of you already know, I was the lucky photographer who took the images for this article.

I spent two days with the reporter, Julia Moskin, visiting restaurants, markets and shops. We had a jam-packed schedule that usually allowed for about 30 minutes in each locale. This was an excellent test of my ability to get high-quality images in a short time period while working with available props and light. I sent in dozens of images and while the Times managed to run a large number (15 in the online slideshow, another 5 embedded in the online story, and 12 in the print version), there are, of course, some other images I really like that weren’t included. I thought I’d share some of those with you here. Hope you enjoy them!

(Full disclosure: the preponderance of Scratch Baking Co. images is because a) I had a lot of time there with unfettered access (the owners are my friends as I live a block away and worked there for a spell) and b) because I’m addicted to their bread and bagels!)

portland farmers' market

Selecting a bunch of turnips from Freedom Farm’s stand at the Portland Farmers’ Market.

Rosemont

Wild Maine blueberries from Beth’s Farm Market for sale by Wealden Farm in the parking lot of Rosemont Bakery & Market.

Micucci

Brian Pramick working in the bread baking area at Micucci Grocery.

Scratch

Allison Reid, co-owner and baker at Scratch Baking Company, sprinkling flour on dough that will be shaped into baguettes.

Bagels at Scratch ready for the oven (foreground) and to be boiled (background).

Bagels at Scratch ready for the oven (foreground) and to be boiled (background).

Lou Slingerland puts seeds on Scratch's highly sought after bagels.

Lou Slingerland puts seeds on Scratch’s highly sought after bagels.

The Ring Ding a Ling, Scratch's answer to the whoopie pie.

The Ring Ding a Ling, Scratch’s creative alternative to the traditional Maine whoopie pie.

Erik Desjarlais, chef and owner of Evangeline.

Erik Desjarlais, chef and owner of Evangeline.

Krista Kern Desjarlais, the owner of and chef at Bresca, with sous chef Courtney Loreg (watch out, she wields a mean knife!).

Krista Kern Desjarlais, the owner of and chef at Bresca, with sous chef Courtney Loreg (watch out, she wields a mean knife!).

Last but certainly not least, Raleigh, very possibly the best dog ever (sorry, Clara), at Rabelais, a cookbook store devoted to new, used and rare books on food, beverages and gardening.

Last but certainly not least, Raleigh, very possibly the best dog ever (sorry, Clara), at Rabelais, a cookbook store devoted to new, used and rare books on food, beverages and gardening.